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LEARNER-CENTERED STRATEGIES

Click on any workshop title for a complete description.

 

LC01 Introduction to Problem Based Learning

LC02 Exploring Alternatives to Lecturing

LC03 Learning the Fundamentals of Teaching

LC04 Mentoring Students

LC05 Redesigning Assignments to Foster Critical Thinking

LC06 Case-Based Teaching:  Facilitating Small Groups

LC08  Motivating Students to Prepare for Class

LC09 Introduction to Active Learning


LC01 Introduction to Problem-Based Learning
Prerequisite: None

Problem-Based Learning (PBL) starts with an authentic, open-ended problem, provides students with the tools and resources to investigate the problem, and often engages student groups in collaborative problem-solving. Through PBL, teachers help students identify, analyze, synthesize, and report information needed to explain the problem. To implement such PBL strategies, this introductory workshop will guide you through the following steps:

  1. writing effective PBL problems.
  2. facilitating group discussion.
  3. evaluating student performance.

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LC02 Exploring Alternatives to Lecturing
Prerequisite: none

This workshop explores the changing roles of teachers in the university and specific pedagogies to meet today's challenges. In addition, this workshop provides a brief overview of pedagogies designed to increase student engagement in the learning process.

Upon completion of this workshop, you will know the following:

  1. how the role of the teacher has changed in university classrooms.
  2. how to incorporate strategies that can improve students' preparation, attendance, and attention.
  3. how to facilitate collaborative learning.

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LC03 Learning the Fundamentals of Teaching (2hrs)
Prerequisite: none

Are you getting ready to teach your first higher ed class?  Or have you been teaching without any formal training in pedagogy?  Or would you just like to review and update your knowledge?  If  you answered "yes" to any of these questions, then this workshop is for you.  Upon completing this seminar, you will be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate your teaching philosophy.
  2. Identify Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) to help you understand your students as learners.
  3. Describe the learning content and process.
  4. Match assessments with objectives.
  5. Evaluate your syllabus according to University guidelines and best practices.
  6. Design an assignment to fulfill most of the “Seven Principles of Best Practice in Undergraduate Education.”
  7. Use a rubric to assess the assignment.

 

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LC04 Mentoring Students (2hrs)
Prerequisite: none

When asked, graduate and professional students often say that one of the things they want most from their university is a mentor.   Research confirms that the close, supportive  relationship that effective mentoring provides can help students succeed in school and their careers.  These relationships may develop as a result of a formal program, or they may emerge  spontaneously.  Whether formal or informal, though, effective mentoring requires skill as well as compassion.  Yet many faculty aren’t sure what mentoring is or how to mentor.  This workshop attempts to address those questions.    After successfully completing this workshop, you will be able to do the following:

1.       define mentoring.

2.       explain how mentoring benefits the mentor as well as the mentee.

3.       identify characteristics of effective mentors.

4.       follow guidelines for mentoring.

5.       locate resources for mentoring.

6.       resolve problem scenarios.

7.       assess the impact of your mentoring.

 

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LC05 Redesigning Assignments to Foster Critical Thinking (2 hrs.)
Prerequisite: Bring an assignment that you plan to use this semester.


Critical thinking has become one of the most sought-after outcomes of higher education. It is one of the competencies featured in most general education standards and, increasingly, professional board examinations. Therefore, this "hands-on" workshop will show you how to redesign your assignments to foster greater critical thinking--i.e., "to get more bang for your buck." By the end of the workshop, you will be able to do the following:

1. Define "critical thinking."

2. Identify characteristics of critical thinking.

3. List factors that facilitate critical thinking.

4. Distinguish assignments that foster critical thinking from those that do not.

5. Evaluate one of your assignments, using a critical thinking rubric.

6. Redesign your assignment to promote greater critical thinking.

7. Locate a rubric to evaluate students' responses to your assignment.

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LC06 Case-Based Teaching:  Facilitating Small Groups (2 hrs.)
Prerequisite: Bring a case you plan to teach, along with the learning objectives and case questions, if possible.


Research suggests that—compared to traditional large-class lecturing—small group discussions help students improve their ability to comprehend, solve problems, and apply knowledge to new situations.  Small groups also increase students’ opportunities to enhance their communication skills and direct their own learning.  Consequently, more and more institutions and accrediting bodies have shifted from an emphasis on lectures to small discussion groups.  If you are transitioning from lecturing, this "hands-on" workshop will show you how to become the “guide by the side” instead of the “sage on the stage.”  Since case-based teaching (CBT)—also known as Case-Based Learning (CBL)—is normally more directive than other small group pedagogies, this workshop will focus on strategies instructors can use to leadsmall group discussions.  By the end of this workshop, you will be able to do the following:


1. Create a supportive environment for group members.

2. Manage the group process.

3. Elicit discussion of the case instead of lecturing.

4. Provide information or feedback when it will foster student learning.

The workshop will engage you in video analysis, group discussion, brainstorming, and role-playing.  You will also receive a rubric to assess your own performance as a small group facilitator.

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LC08  Motivating Students to Prepare for Class  (2 hrs.)
Prerequisite: none

Are you tired of teaching students who come to class unprepared?  Whether you assign readings, slide shows, videos, websites, or other course materials for homework, wouldn’t you love to begin a small group session, class discussion, lab, clinical session, or another activity, knowing that your students were ready to apply what you assigned for homework?  If so, sign up for this workshop so that you will be able to do the following—and so that your students will become more independent learners:

  1. Identify the reasons that many university students do not do their homework.
  2. Identify common intrinsic and extrinsic motivators for university students.
  3. Identify teaching strategies that can increase your students’ motivation to do their homework before class.

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LC09 Introduction to Active Learning (2 hrs.)
Prerequisite: none

Are you tired of facing a roomful of passive students day after day?  Are you frustrated because your students still don’t know how to apply, analyze, synthesize, or evaluate your subject matter?  Or have you "flipped" your classroom and shifted some instruction online—only to wonder, “What do I do in the classroom now?”  Whatever your motivation may be, this seminar will introduce you to multiple strategies for stimulating active learning in your classroom, including game-based learning, polling, case-based teaching, and role-playing.  You will not only learn about such strategies but also try out a few.

Upon successfully completing this seminar, participants will be able to do the following:

  1. Define “active learning.”
  2. Explain the benefits and challenges of active learning to your students.
  3. Describe several active-learning strategies.
  4. Evaluate some of these strategies through first-hand experience.
  5. Select at least two active-learning strategies that will help your students fulfill your learning objectives.

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