CETLA logo




ENTREPRENEURSHIP

 

 

Hosted by the HU ELI Institute and the Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Assessment

Click on any workshop title for a complete description.                 

EL01 Planning an Entrepreneurial Venture

EL02 Infusing Entrepreneurship into Your Curriculum

EL03 "Understanding Certification Vs Licensure"
Guest Instructor: Arvind Nandedkar, Ph.D.

EL04 Teaching and Analyzing Entrepreneurship Case Studies
Guest Instructor: Susan Harmeling, Ph.D.

EL05 Infusing Entrepreneurship Themes in Your Course
Guest Instructor: Elka Stevens, Ph.D.

ELO6 Entrepreneurship Health & Wellness Symposium (TBA)

 

eli_logoAbout E.L.I. Institute

 

 

The Institute for Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation Institute (E.L.I.) headquartered at Howard University, was founded in 2003 as a national repository for information vital to the growth and development of minority business enterprises.  The Institute is funded by the Kauffman Foundation, Howard University, and other partners.  It seeks to transform the way entrepreneurship is taught and experienced so that any student, regardless of their field of study, will have the opportunity and ability to participate.

 

Howard University’s ELI Institute Named Among Ten Top College Programs for Entrepreneurs” by Fortune Small Business Magazine.

   

 

Note: We also recommend Stanford's podcasts on entrepreneurship, especially Tina Seelig's "The Art of Teaching Entrepreneurship and Innovation."


EL01 Planning an Entrepreneurial Venture (online)
Prerequisite: none

“Planning an Entrepreneurial Venture” (PEV) is an online tutorial designed to help faculty across the curriculum teach students what they need to know to start a business.  Through videos and exercises, faculty will discover tools to show students what kind of people become successful entrepreneurs, what makes an opportunity different from an idea, and what sort of planning is needed to start a successful business.  This tutorial was developed specifically for faculty who are interested in infusing entrepreneurship into their curriculum.  It is designed for all faculty, regardless of their discipline.  Upon successful completion of this tutorial, you will be able to do the following:

  1. define “entrepreneurship.”
  2. recognize opportunities.
  3. define a business concept.
  4. test feasibility.
  5. describe and protect a product or service.

Log into http://blackboard.howard.edu. (If you've never logged into Blackboard, your username is your 8-digit Bison ID without @ and your password is your Bison PIN.)  Then scroll down until you see "SP2008 ELI Institute Planning Entrepreneur Venture" in the COURSES box on the right.  Click the title to enter the course.  If you have questions about the course, email cathy.house@eliinstitute.com .

Jump to the top of this page.

 


EL02 Infusing Entrepreneurship into Your Curriculum

 

How can faculty promote entrepreneurship across the curriculum?  Isn’t entrepreneurship just for business, law, and pre-med majors?  Hardly!  Don’t miss this opportunity to learn how you can apply entrepreneurial concepts in your curriculum, regardless of your discipline.  This video will introduce you to the resources you need to do the following:

  

1.  Design unique courses in entrepreneurship – for all majors.

 

2.  Prepare your students for entrepreneurial careers--regardless of the discipline.

 

3.  Develop a curriculum for an ever-changing world where entrepreneurship is becoming increasingly important.

 

Dr. Anthony Mendes  
Dr. Anthony Mendes Watch Video Segment: 1 :: 2 :: 3 :: 4 :: 5 :: 6

 

Jump to the top of this page.

 


EL03 Understanding Certification Vs Licensure ( 1hr.)

   Prerequisite: none
   Guest Instructor: Arvind Nandedkar, Ph.D.

Why do you need certification? How can you obtain certification in your field? What is the difference between certification and licensure?  How can certification and licensure enhance your marketability? How can they help you become a successful entrepreneur? How can they help you augment your earning capacity?

By the end of this workshop, you will be able to do the following:

1.      Identify the key differences between certification and licensure.

2.      Distinguish the various types of certifications.

3.      Determine how to obtain additional information about certification.

4.      List relevant considerations for certification and licensing processes.

5.      Describe the distinctive organizational basis for program differentiation.

click here to view the Powerpoint presentation (pdf)

Jump to the top of this page.

 


EL04 Teaching and Analyzing Entrepreneurship Case Studies (one-day certification seminar, breakfast and lunch served)
Guest Instructor: Susan Harmeling, Ph.D.

Prerequisite: none
Guest Instructor: Susan Harmeling, Ph.D.

This one-day seminar introduces entrepreneurship case studies as a tool for stimulating active learning in any discipline.  Entrepreneurship case studies are student-centered activities based on topics that demonstrate theoretical concepts in an applied setting.   This interactive learning strategy will be taught by an experienced case writer and entrepreneurship professor.

Upon successful completion of this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Teach students how to apply theoretical concepts to real-life examples.
  2. Help your students develop key skills such as communication, teamwork, and problem-solving.
  3. Identify the differences and similarities between project-based learning (similar in structure to case- study learning) and problem-based learning.

Click the link below to obtain the case study that you will need to bring to class:

http://harvardbusinessonline.hbsp.harvard.edu
 

Jump to the top of this page.

 


EL05 Infusing Entrepreneurship Themes in Your Course (1 hrs.)

Prerequisite: none
Guest Instructor:
Elka Stevens, Ph.D.

“Entrepreneurship Curriculum Infusion” is the process of integrating entrepreneurship content into courses across the curriculum.  Infusing entrepreneurship is an effective strategy for stimulating creative thinking and active learning, regardless of the discipline.

Upon successful completion of the workshop, you will learn how to do the following:

  1. Motivate students using the power and energy of entrepreneurship.
  2. Encourage entrepreneurship research in a specific discipline.
  3. Promote student ownership of a business related to a student’s discipline.
  4. Create modules that provide students with practical ways to improve business decision-making skills within their field.

Jump to the top of this page.

 


About Us | Site Map | Contact Us | WWW Disclaimer | ©2007 Howard University, all rights reserved.