Flipping the Classroom

 

Learn how to "flip" your classroom to transform your teaching and your students' learning! Instead of lecturing in the classroom, post videos of your lectures and other course materials online so that you can "free up" classroom time for more teacher-student and student-student interaction. Flipping the classroom will allow you to spend more classroom time helping students apply what they learned online. That means you can engage students in more class discussions, more group activities, more hands-on labs, or more fieldwork. Instead of passively listening to lectures, students can engage in active learning. For details and examples, see the resources on this webpage.
Click here to listen to a skit that explains why you should consider flipping the classroom. Click here to view the rest of Dr.Andre Farquharson's lecture about Flipping the Classroom.

Examples

After clicking the PLAY button, click the bottom right corner of the video thumbnail to enlarge the screen.

Pharmacy



Chemistry



Nursing



Anatomy



Communication



Art History



Spanish



Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Why should you consider flipping the classroom?

A: As explained above, flipping the classroom frees up time for more active learning. However, it also allows you to accommodate students' differences—different learning styles and different rates of progress in mastering the material. For instance, instead of "teaching to the middle" of the class, you can spontaneously organize and tutor a group of students who are struggling with a concept while challenging advanced students to move ahead at their own pace. You can also engage kinesthetic learners in hands-on practice or interpersonal learners in collaborative activities.


Q: What can you do during classroom time?

A: A lot! Now you have time for more Q & A, real-world applications, and hands-on practice. This is a wonderful opportunity to incorporate more laboratory experiments, field work, case-based assignments, role play, and problem-solving so that students practice applying the concepts they learned online. Flipping the classroom also provides more opportunities for you to answer students' questions and for them to learn from their classmates as well.


Q: How can you ensure that students study the content you posted BEFORE they come to class?

A: Make sure students know that they must come to class prepared; otherwise, their learning and grades will suffer. BEFORE class, test them on the posted material via an online quiz on Blackboard, or ask them to submit an assignment or questions about the posted material. Also, let students know that you will use Blackboard's tools to track their online activity. Then assess the quality of their classroom participation and incorporate your assessment into their course grade.


Q: What if some students don't have access to a reliable high-speed Internet connection at home?

A: Remind students that they have access to a reliable high-speed Internet connection in Howard's campus and dorm labs. However, some students without adequate Internet access cannot stay on campus long enough to finish their homework in the labs. In those cases, some of the students may still have Internet access via their smartphones; if they download the Blackboard Mobile app, they can access the videos and materials via their cellular networks. In the event that a student lacks cellphone access, the student can download videos or files in a campus lab and take them home for viewing on a flash drive.


Q: Is flipping the classroom the same as teaching a hybrid?

A: Not necessarily. When you teach a hybrid, you reduce classroom time by teaching online. For instance, you might convert a Monday, Wednesday, Friday class into a class that meets in the classroom only on Mondays and Wednesdays and then do the rest of your teaching online. In contrast, if you flipped a class, you would probably still meet in the classroom every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. You would just spend your classroom time differently since students would have already listened to your lectures online.


Q: What technologies are available at Howard for flipping the classroom?

A: We recommend that you use Howard's new lecture capture tool, Tegrity (coming soon). With your own webcam or a smart room camera, you can videotape your lecture "anywhere, anytime" and, as long as you can access the Internet, upload your recording to Tegrity's servers. Tegrity will quickly synchronize your video, voice, and any slides, webpages, or applications displayed on your computer. It will also index the video so that students can easily pinpoint what they want to repeat. Then it will stream the lecture "on demand" to any student device (e.g., laptop, tablet, or smartphone). Although you can post your lectures elsewhere, Tegrity will automatically post your lectures in the Blackboard course of your choice. Posting the lectures on Blackboard will allow you to post the links within course modules alongside other related materials and to track student viewing. If you wish, you can even authorize your students to use Tegrity to record group projects or assignments.


Q: What training resources are available at Howard for flipping the classroom?

A: You can take advantage of CETLA's hands-on workshops and online tutorials to learn how to use Tegrity and how to engage students in more active learning. See the list below.


Q: What can you do in the classroom if you stop lecturing all the time?

A: Engage your students in "active learning," i.e., learning that requires students to interact with you, the course material, and/or other students. Popular kinds of active learning include case-based teaching, role-playing, problem-solving, lab experiments, fieldwork, journal-writing, inquiry-based learning, group discussions, and other learner-center strategies. You can even integrate active learning in a lecture if you break the lecture into 15-minute "mini-lectures" and engage students in "Quick Think," "clicker," or "Writing Across the Curriculum" activities. See http://cgi.stanford.edu/~dept-ctl/cgi-bin/tomprof/posting.php?ID=1297 for examples and "Workshops & Tutorials" below for descriptions and training opportunities.

Workshops and Tutorials

We recommend the following workshops and tutorials to help you post your lectures, ensure that students come to class prepared, and stimulate active learning in the classroom:

CETLA's Hands-on Workshops

CETLA's Online Tutorials

Online Resource Centers Guest Lectures by HU Faculty (sign in here)
  • Stimulating Class Discussions
  • Stimulating Student Creativity
  • Stimulating Quantitative Reasoning
  • Developing Critical Thinking
  • Managing Student Groups
  • Case-Based Teaching
  • Engaging Students
  • Assessing the Impact of High-Impact Practices on African American Students
  • Using Drama as a Teaching Tool
  • Teaching with Humor
  • Service Learning
  • Multiple Intelligences and Learning Styles
  • How College Students Learn

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SECTION LINKS

FAQs


Workshops & Tutorials


Tegrity Resource Center


References


Active Learning


 

Examples


Pharmacy


Chemistry


Nursing


Anatomy


Communication


Art History


Spanish